Post Tagged with: "crime"

150: David Leavitt This Prosecutor Wants to Prosecute Less Crimes

150: David Leavitt This Prosecutor Wants to Prosecute Less Crimes

With so many laws on the books, there are virtually unlimited ways that a person can become a criminal. This puts an enormous strain on our legal and judicial system. Utah County Attorney David Leavitt joins us to discuss a groundbreaking approach that he is trying that seeks to handle problems in ways other than simply prosecuting people. Learn what he hopes to accomplish and how it could cut down on the the unnecessary criminalization that bogs down our justice system.   Links mentioned: There’s a new top prosecutor in Utah County, and he says he’ll reform the criminal justice […]
June 18, 2019
146: Molly Davis on What It’s Like Touring a Prison

146: Molly Davis on What It’s Like Touring a Prison

Unless we personally know someone who has been incarcerated, chances are that we know very little about the prison system. It’s a part of life that takes place out of sight and out of mind for many us and we seem to prefer it that way. Libertas policy analyst Molly Davis joins Connor to discuss their takeaways from a recent tour they did at the Central Utah Correctional Facility in Gunnison, Utah.   Links mentioned: Prison Rape is the Criminal Justice Issue No One is Talking About by Brad Polumbo and Molly Davis Who is Watching the Inmate Watchers? by […]
June 3, 2019
140: Rebecca Vallas on a Clean Slate for a Second Chance at Life

140: Rebecca Vallas on a Clean Slate for a Second Chance at Life

Everyone makes mistakes. But when that mistake is a criminal one, should it follow a person for the rest of his or her life? Few of us understand the process of expungement and how it can provide a person with an opportunity for starting over with a clean slate. Rebecca Vallas from the Center for American Progress joins Connor to discuss why it’s in our interest to provide some offenders with a second chance at life.   Links mentioned: Clean Slate
May 4, 2019
118: Brett Tolman Confessions of a Former U.S. Attorney

118: Brett Tolman Confessions of a Former U.S. Attorney

Most of us tend to take for granted that our justice system works. This means we assume that the system is hard at work protecting the innocent by only putting bad guys in jail. Our guest may cause you to rethink that assumption. Brett Tolman is a former U.S. Attorney and prosecutor for the federal government. Now, he is a criminal justice reformer who is working to address some serious problems within the system. Learn what he came to realize and what he is doing to correct some of the institutional obstacles to authentic justice. 
October 23, 2018
65: Weldon Angelos on Mandatory Minimum Sentencing

65: Weldon Angelos on Mandatory Minimum Sentencing

Most of us have little experience with the justice system. That’s why we tend to believe that it’s operating in our interests at all times. Weldon Angelos knows better. He was at the center of a criminal case in which he was sentenced to 55 years in federal prison for a first time offense of selling marijuana. Mandatory minimum sentencing laws were the reason. Even the judge who sentenced him protested that the sentence was unjust and that there were far more serious crimes for which people would serve less time. Once you’ve heard Weldon’s story, you’ll better understand why […]
February 16, 2018
45: Sheldon Gilbert on Civil Asset Forfeiture

45: Sheldon Gilbert on Civil Asset Forfeiture

Civil asset forfeiture lets law enforcement seize and sell property they assert has been involved in criminal activity. This means your money, your car, home or other valuable items can be taken from you without you having been charged with – much less convicted of – a crime. It’s one thing to prevent someone from profiting from criminal acts once they’ve been afforded due process and convicted of a crime. Taking the property of innocent people is something else. Sheldon Gilbert from the Institute of Justice joins us to discuss civil asset forfeiture and what is being done in regards to much-needed […]
November 7, 2017
42: The Virtue of the Black Market

42: The Virtue of the Black Market

When we hear the term “black market” many of us think of illegal goods trading hands in the shadows. But a closer look at what constitutes black market activity shows that even simple things like beekeeping, lemonade stands and other unregulated–yet voluntary–exchanges are also examples of the black market. Can there be virtue in helping one another meet our needs without first seeking government permission? 
October 26, 2017
36: What Should Be Done Regarding Immigration?

36: What Should Be Done Regarding Immigration?

Few subjects spark the kind of emotional polarization that the topic of immigration does. Like most issues, once immigration became politicized, it became a power struggle. Communities across America are deeply divided over what should be done. In this episode, we examine the most common concerns, misconceptions and the underlying principles of limited government that pertain to immigration in America.  
October 5, 2017
31: Eric Moutsos Confessions of a Former Police Officer

31: Eric Moutsos Confessions of a Former Police Officer

Do arrest and ticket quotas help or harm the efforts of local police? Former Salt Lake City officer Eric Moutsos describes what happens when police administrators tell officers they’re being evaluated on how many tickets they write and how many arrests they make. He explains how it’s a great way to create unnecessary distance between the police and the communities they serve. Eric speaks from a position of first hand experience and a desire to see a meaningful conversation begin before the divide grows any larger.
September 20, 2017
29: Commander Dale Brown on Privatizing Protection of People & Property

29: Commander Dale Brown on Privatizing Protection of People & Property

How differently might police protect and serve the public if their departments were subject to the same market forces and customer choice as the private sector? Commander Dale Brown of the Detroit-based Threat Management Center has some answers that will likely surprise you. He spells out what the past couple of decades have revealed in places where private security provides protection. When protectors of people and property are accountable to their customers, the quality of service goes up and the propensity for violence goes down.
September 15, 2017